“Can I Keep My Stuff?”



“Can I keep my stuff?” is one of the most common questions asked by a bankruptcy client of Bailey & Galyen, and for the overwhelming majority of our clients, the answer is yes … you can keep your stuff after a bankruptcy.

Assuming you have lived in Texas at least two years before the filing of a bankruptcy, you can choose between the Texas and Federal “exemptions” – laws that allow you to protect and keep property through a bankruptcy. The choice of exemptions is an important legal decision that will be based on kind of property you own and its value, and at Bailey & Galyen our job is to maximize your exemptions. Both exemption paths have a few things in common:

• Homesteads are exempt from your ordinary creditors. Mortgages, taxes, and certain other debts remain on your home.
• Most vehicles are exempt from your ordinary creditors, but like houses are subject to valid debts from any vehicle finance company.
• Retirement assets (such as 401ks, IRAs, pensions, teachers’ retirement, etc.) are exempt from your creditors.
• Most if not all of your personal property assets are also exempt from ordinary creditors (unless they have a “purchase money” lien on them like a car loan), such as furniture, clothing, jewelry, tools of the trade, pets, and household goods.

There are important limits on exemptions, and here at Bailey & Galyen our job is to apply the law to your specific situation so you know what your options are. Even if you own property of a kind that is normally not exempt, there may be bankruptcy options available to you that allow you to keep non-exempt property.

On a related note, you can also keep certain debts. Depending on the chapter of bankruptcy selected and your payment status with the creditor, you are generally able to keep debts on necessary property, such as your homestead and vehicle. “Reaffirming” these debts in a chapter 7 bankruptcy allows those debts to survive the bankruptcy so that you can keep the collateral (house or car) and hopefully rebuild your credit by continuing to pay those particular creditors.

Texas: ‘Miracle’ or Myth?

What does it mean to be a middle class wage-earner and consumer in Texas?

For too many families, it meansâ a struggle to make ends meet. Texans want safe, stable jobs with decent wages and reasonable benefits that allow them to raise a family, own a home, and save for a comfortable retirement. Much has been made lately about job growth in Texas. Unfortunately, for middle class Texans, the so-called “Texas Miracle” has been more myth than reality. So, how does Texas stack up to the rest of the nation on key quality of life indicators?

So, how about those jobs? Texas has the highest rate of workers paid at or below the federal minimum wage and our median hourly wage is 10% lower than the national average. We are dead last in the percent of Texans with health insurance and are near the bottom in the percent of workers with employer-based health insurance.

As for workplace safety, nine Texans die on the job every week, making Texas the deadliest state to work in, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. We also have the highest rate of workplace fatalities among the 10 biggest states. Also, with a quarter of workers without workers’ compensation coverage, we are last in workers’ compensation coverage, lagging far behind the rest of the country.

And home ownership? Texas ranks near the bottom in the rate of home ownership, a fact that is exacerbated by our high rates of personal bankruptcy, low personal credit scores, and high rates of foreclosure and subprime mortgages. Plus, with the highest home insurance rates in the nation, more of our money is going to pad insurance company profits.

Finally, what about that comfortable retirement? It isn’t so comfortable. Texas ranks near the bottom in median household net worth and in the “nest egg index” which looks at personal savings and investing behavior. Also, nearly half of middle income Texans report having less than $5,000 in total savings – over a quarter have less than $1,000.

This stark reality is compounded by a lax regulatory climate that typically favors industry over individuals and a broken civil justice system that is too often closed to consumers, patients, and workers who face needless injury and financial devastation. That’s right. If you are hurt on the job, ripped off by your insurance company, or have your savings wiped out by Wall Street shenanigans, you likely won’t be able to have your day in court.

Not quite the picture of middle class bliss that many politicians and spinmeisters would have us believe.

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